How do I delete a folder that’s in use?

[Origin]: https://superuser.com/questions/2937/how-do-i-delete-a-folder-thats-in-use

Sometimes when I’m working in Windows I’ll get this prompt when I try to delete a directory:

Folder In Use
The action can't be completed because the folder is open in another program
Close the folder and try again.

However, the folder isn’t “in use” at all, and I don’t have it open. So how can I delete it short of rebooting?

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There’s a native GUI for Windows:

Start>>All Programs>>Accessories>>System Tools>>Resource Monitor (or Run resmon.exe)

You can search for the “Associated Handles” using the searchbox (circled in red), and right click the process you want to end.


As an example, in the image below I could not delete my Eclipse directory. Searching for the Eclipse associated handles showed that the adb.exe had a handle to the directory. After ending the adb process, I could then delete the Eclipse directory.

enter image description here

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[Bash on Windows] Getting dbus and X server working

[Origin]: https://www.reddit.com/r/Windows10/comments/4rsmzp/bash_on_windows_getting_dbus_and_x_server_working/

submitted 1 year ago * by ShaRose

So, most people who are using bash subsystem in the windows 10 insider builds seem to be aware that it’s possible to use X servers for windows such as vcxsrv or Xming, but most applications require the dbus service, which doesn’t work. This results in applications like Firefox or virt-manager (when ran in the linux subsystem) to crash either on launch or after a short time, and so it’s seen as fairly buggy.

However, the main application I wanted to run for this was virt-manager, because I wanted to be able to administrate qemu servers on windows without having to use a VM to run that. virt-manager needs a dbus server to even launch, so I started trying to get it running: And I succeeded. And surprisingly, it was fairly easy.

All that needed to be done (From a clean install of windows 10 with Bash installed, of course) was do three steps:

1) install an X server. vcxsrv and Xming are confirmed to both work just fine.

2) add DISPLAY=:0.0 to your bashrc: you can do this by executing the following command

echo "export DISPLAY=:0.0" >> ~/.bashrc

Now X programs will show the window correctly.

3) Now we need to fix dbus: The issue with this was that by default, dbus uses unix sockets to communication, which windows bash at the moment doesn’t support. So we just need to tell it to use tcp. In /etc/dbus-1/session.conf, you need to replace <listen>unix:tmpdir=/tmp</listen> with <listen>tcp:host=localhost,port=0</listen> and then you are done. Note this file needs root to edit. An easy way to do this is to execute the following:

sudo sed -i ‘s$&lt;listen&gt;.*&lt;/listen&gt;$&lt;listen&gt;tcp:host=localhost,port=0&lt;/listen&gt;$’ /etc/dbus-1/session.conf

And now close bash, and open it again. Feel free now to run whatever: Firefox and virt-manager work. Chrome sadly doesn’t for another reason of note.

Hope that helps someone.

New text document shortcut missing from the right click option

Origin: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-desktop/new-text-document-shortcut-missing-from-the-right/022309a6-cd08-41df-8e55-95e83397ae73

Pat Mok replied on November 5, 2009See post history

Check that this key exists HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.txt\ShellNew\NullFile

If it doesn`t exist,create it.Just right click in the right hand pane of the ShellNew key,
and select New/String value,then type: NullFile

How to Access Your Ubuntu Bash Files in Windows (and Your Windows System Drive in Bash)

Origin: https://www.howtogeek.com/261383/how-to-access-your-ubuntu-bash-files-in-windows-and-your-windows-system-drive-in-bash/

By Chris Hoffman on July 6th, 2016

Windows 10’s “Bash on Ubuntu on Windows” environment contains a few different components. The first time you run the bash.exe program, it will download and install an entire Ubuntu user space environment. You can access these files in File Explorer or other Windows programs, if you know where to look.

You can also access your Windows system drive–and any other drives on your computer–from within the Ubuntu Bash shell. This allows you to work with your normal Windows files using Linux command-line utilities.

Where the Ubuntu Bash Shell Files Are Stored in Windows

Note that each Windows user account that uses Bash will have its own separate Bash environment and files under its own user directory.

To access these files, you’ll first need to show hidden folders in File Explorer. Open a File Explorer window and click View > Options > Change Folder and Search Options.

In the Folder Options window that appears, select View > Show Hidden Files, Folders, and Drives.

Navigate to the following directory to find these folders:

C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Local\lxss

The Ubuntu system files are stored at:

C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Local\Lxss\rootfs

Your Ubuntu user account’s home folder is stored at:

C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Local\Lxss\home\USERNAME

The root account’s home folder is stored at:

C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Local\Lxss\root

Where Your Windows System Drive Appears in Bash

The Ubuntu Bash shell environment makes your full Windows system drive available so you can work with the same files in both environments. However, the Bash environment doesn’t just dump you in your C:\ drive. Instead, it places you in /, or the root directory you’d have on Linux. If you perform an ls command to view the contents of the directory, you’ll just see the Ubuntu directories that provide the Linux environment.

Your Windows system drive and other connected drives are exposed in the /mnt/ directory here, where other drives are traditionally made available in the Linux directory structure. Specifically, you’ll find the C: drive at the following in the Bash environment:

/mnt/c

To change to this directory with the “cd” command, run the following command:

cd /mnt/c

If you have a D: drive, you’ll find it located at /mnt/d, and so on.

For example, to access a file stored at C:\Users\Chris\Downloads\File.txt, you’d need to use the path /mnt/c/Users/Chris/Downloads/File.txt in the Bash environment.

Note that, when accessing Windows system files, your Bash shell environment has the permissions it was launched with. If you launched it normally from the shortcut, it will have the same file access permissions your Windows user account does.

For example, if you want to access the C:\Users\Administrator folder, you’d need to right-click the Bash shell shortcut and select “Run as Administrator” to launch the Bash shell with Windows Administrator privileges.

This works just like the Command Prompt, which needs to be launched as Administrator if you need write access to Administrator-only files, or write access to system files. You can’t just use “sudo” in the Bash environment.

Visual Studio 2013. You do not have sufficient privilege to access IIS web sites on your machine

[Origin]: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/20984624/visual-studio-2013-you-do-not-have-sufficient-privilege-to-access-iis-web-sites

I just installed VS2013 and turned on IIS 7 on my Windows 7 Ultimate x64 machine. When trying to open a solution I get:

Creation of the virtual directory localhost:xxxxx failed with the error: Unable to access the IIS metabase. You do not have sufficient privilege to access IIS web sites on your machine.

I tried running Visual Studio 2013 as Administrator (right click, run as administrator), still the same error. I also did aspnet_regiis -i and it didn’t help either.

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Go to C:\Windows\System32\inetsrv. Click config folder. You will get a popup – “You don’t have access to this folder – Click continue to permanently get access to this folder”. Perform same for Export folder which is inside config folder. You should be able to open the solution and the web application project will be deployed on IIS.

enter image description here

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How to enable NumLock on the Logon screen and Lock screen in Windows 10

[Origin] http://winaero.com/blog/enable-numlock-logon-screen-windows-10/

How to enable NumLock on the Logon screen and Lock screen in Windows 10

If your Windows account password or user name includes numerals, you might need to frequently use the numeric keypad to enter them. For that you need to enable NumLock, which may not on by default on your Logon screen/Lock screen in Windows 10. In this article, we will see how to enable Num Lock by default. This trick will also work in Windows 8.1, Windows 8 and Windows 7.

Enable NumLock by default in Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows 7

This does not require any Registry hacks or changes to system settings.
Simply boot to the login screen or the Lock screen and do the following:

  1. On the Logon/Lock screen, press the NumLock key on the keyboard to turn it on.
  2. The Login screen contains a power button in the bottom right corner. Use it to reboot Windows:Windows 10 reboot from login screen

The next time Windows boots, NumLock will be automatically enabled. If this trick does not work for you for some reason, try the Registry tweak below. It should work in all modern Windows versions including Windows 10 and Windows 8.x.

Enable NumLock by default using Registry tweak

Here we go.

  1. Open Registry Editor.
  2. Go to the following Registry key:
    HKEY_USERS\.DEFAULT\Control Panel\Keyboard

    Tip: You can access any desired Registry key with one click.
    If you do not have this Registry key, then just create it.

  3. Find the string value called “InitialKeyboardIndicators”. In Windows 7, set its value data to 2. In Windows 8 and above, set its value to 80000002. A note for Windows 10 users: if your Windows 10 does not save the state of NumLock after the reboot, try to set the value “InitialKeyboardIndicators” to 2147483650. This will turn on NumLock on the logon screen starting from the next boot.enable numlock Windows 10

Bonus tip:Using the InitialKeyboardIndicators parameter, it is possible to control other keys besides NumLock. See the table for its possible values for Windows 7:

InitialKeyboardIndicators value Purpose
0 Turn all indicators off (NumLock, CapsLock, ScrollLock)
1 Turn CapsLock on
2 Turn NumLock on
3 Turn CapsLock and NumLock on
4 Turn ScrollLock on
5 Turn CapsLock and ScrollLock on
6 Turn NumLock and ScrollLock on
7 Turn all indicators on (NumLock, CapsLock, ScrollLock)

For Windows 8 and above you should try to use values like 80000000,80000001,80000002, i.e. add 80000000 to Windows 7 value.

You can save your time and use Winaero Tweaker instead. It comes with the following feature:

Winaero Tweaker Enable Numlock

You can download it here: Download Winaero Tweaker.
That’s it.

 

How to view user privileges using windows cmd?

[Origin]: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11607389/how-to-view-user-privileges-using-windows-cmd

I’d start with secedit /export /areas USER_RIGHTS /cfg OUTFILE.CFG. Then examine the line for the relevant privilege. However, the problem now is that the accounts are listed as SIDs, not usernames.

shareedit

This is pretty horrible to use but it works well. After exporting the template using Simon’s command above, you can import it again using: Secedit /configure /db secedit.sdb /cfg outfile.cfg /quiet /areas USER_RIGHTS– NikG Mar 20 ’15 at 17:51